China Shakes the World: A Titans Rise and Troubled Future – and the Challenge for America

China Shakes the World: A Titan's Rise and Troubled Future -- And the Challenge for America
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  • China Shakes the World: A Titan's Rise and Troubled Future -- and the Challenge for America?
  • China Shakes the World: A Titan's Rise and Troubled Future -- and the Challenge for America?
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Analyzes China's economic rise and its impact on global affairs, assessing China's weaknesses--environmental pollution, crisis in social trust, weak financial system, and faltering government institutions--in terms of their disruptive effects on the world. Also in This Series. Similar Titles From NoveList.

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China Shakes the World

Even if the country's gross domestic product one day becomes as large as that of the US, simple mathematics ordains that its people at that time will on average be only one-sixth as wealthy as Americans. In terms of balance, perspective and brilliant analysis of what China is today and where it is going tomorrow, this is the best book you can buy.

Feb 08, Matthew rated it really liked it Shelves: business-history , economics , essaysjournalism. This review will probably say more about the reviewer me than about the book most reviews probably do, if less blatantly. I felt compelled, disgusted, proud, in turn, yet in ways that are interesting if perhaps not quite unexpected -- rather, I feel like Kynge's writing so neatly synthesizes and brings to life a lot of what I already subsconsciously gleaned about China from years of living in Singapore that red dot some mistake as part of China , that I find myself reacting in vaguely famil This review will probably say more about the reviewer me than about the book most reviews probably do, if less blatantly.

I felt compelled, disgusted, proud, in turn, yet in ways that are interesting if perhaps not quite unexpected -- rather, I feel like Kynge's writing so neatly synthesizes and brings to life a lot of what I already subsconsciously gleaned about China from years of living in Singapore that red dot some mistake as part of China , that I find myself reacting in vaguely familiar yet never quite so cleanly recognised ways.

It makes me wonder a lot about myself -- Chinese by race, yet not by nationality and certainly not at all by cultural identity. I find the reports of piracy awful, and extremely disturbing. I don't worry so much about the fact that GE or Siemens or Honda had their top end technology, developed after spending billions and decades, stolen in China. I guess I find it hard to sympathise with a corporation that has ways and means to protect itself and anyhow can benefit from China's human resource base and market. I felt most for, rather, the Italian family owned silk tie maker whose designs -- one mystical elliptical design that took years to refine for example -- were bought for practically nothing by Chinese tie makers who'd bankrupted the Italians with the low cost silk.

In this sense I think China really had an advantage that few -- even those who recognise it -- give it full credit for, the fact that they got cheap access to so much technology, so much know-how, so many industrial and aesthetic designs and best practices, that it took centuries and decades for other societies to master. I find that incredibly tragic. Of the former, I respect their aesthetic, their intelligence, their morality, their social graces, their attitude to life, and I am on the whole more comfortable with such and wish that more of my countrymen had the imaginative capacity to live so.

Certainly, I respect how hard the Chinese entrepreneurs suffered and how hungry and resourceful and lucky they must be. On the other hand I am genuinely glad that China is throwing off the shackles of Western colonialism: I have no love for your occasional obnoxious clumsy self-unaware wealthy fatcat expat -- and that surely is a very Asian view.

How The U.S. And China Are Fighting For Global Power

And unlike your average Westerner, I'm not particularly disgusted by all the encroachments of human rights, nor of the corruption or melamine or blood transfusion scandals. Maybe it's because I am, after all, from Southeast Asia, and this sort of thing is, well not really standard stuff, but still not that surprising. Or maybe it is an extension of the above -- every race has its master criminals, it's not as if the Chinese are uniquely heartless here sure, poisoning babies sounds bad, but how about financing wars?

I'm actually quite impressed by the scale, boldness, ruthlessness and creativity of the scams. Possibly it's also because I feel the disregard for human life -- other people's lives, I mean -- is part of Chinese history. One of the four Chinese classics, Water Margin or All Men Are Brothers, has parts where a hero is eating meat dumplings and discovers it is delicious human flesh, or, less benignly, is himself captured by a rogue innkeeper and about to be slaughtered for meat, when the butcher recognises and saves him.

This implies that if he had been someone less well-regarded he'd have been butchered with nary a thought. In fact, when the butcher joins the hero's side, he becomes, within the narrative, a minor hero too. Water Margin was one of my favourite books when I was growing up; I've probably imbibed lot of the values.

James Kynge

But what's behind all this? Here I think Kynge hesitates to pass judgment. He describes the symptoms but as a journalist, prefers to allow readers to draw their own conclusions. So we must. I think Barry Naughton captures it best -- China just has too many people, and has had too many people for too long.

I'm not saying other things don't matter -- like forward looking leaders at the top, economic liberalisation, gradual institutionalisation, etc.

But I think these merely facilitate a power that wells up from a source, and that source -- of both successes and failures -- can be traced back to demographics; from enormous market size, leading to firms jostling to enter, the immense amount of talent, the cheap human resources with an extremely hungry labor force willing to work for peanuts, the willingness to cheat to get ahead, etc. Naughton quotes a European visitor to China in the s -- the Chinese peasant is like a man standing in deep water, on his tiptoes, with only his nose above water for breath.

He quotes statistics noting that China's growth from the Middle Ages onwards was entirely due to population growth, and that the average incomes remained stuck at medieval levels even as Europe grew by leaps and bounds; yet the population continued to increase, which means that the burden on the land was extremely heavy.

Thus, the above phrase -- disregard for human life is endemic -- can be turned around, to the equal statement: in China, human life, far from being priceless, is cheap. View 1 comment. James Kynge employs his experiences as a former bureau chief and journalist in Asia for various news outlets over several years to support his theories. The idea is that when China arrives at the point of becoming a global super power or at least a force to be reckoned with that it its presence will penetrate to the far reaches of the global community, like that of the United States has done in the past few decades.

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To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Oh, and if there are any Houghton Mifflin editors reading this, note that maps would have been useful. Reset password Go back. China is going to be a huge, huge problem for a lot of reasons. About AbeBooks.

The problem, argues Kynge is that China has awoken, has arrived at the point of nearly emerging as a global power. Due to its massive population base its presence is truly being felt worldwide as Chinese students fill up foreign schools by the millions, western countries move more and more of their means of manufacturing to the east and the millions of Chinese in their homeland increase in their demand for food, jobs and resources.

Due to the rise of the Chinese tiger many states hold a great unease or fear for Beijing. Kynge argues however that this may be unnecessary, the reason being that though China commands a massive manufacturing and industrial base and an even larger population, in its search to feed, employ and clothe and care for its innumerable citizenry it has wedded itself to the global community and market in such a way that to negatively affect said market would prove disastrous to itself and others. An aging population, rampant corruption in government and the police, pollution and other issues will ultimately prove a formidable obstacle to the Chinese and now consequently the rest of the world due to Chinese entrance into global politics and economics.

I'm afraid that I find this book a little hard to measure, as I am unused to reading anything written about China from an external perspective.

While an alternative view is, of course, necessary, I cannot help but feel that there are very few people qualified to write about China. To write about China is to understand an incredibly complex country and its people. James Kynge definitely makes an admirable effort, but the tone of the books is, at times, skewed and has a tendency to veer from ration I'm afraid that I find this book a little hard to measure, as I am unused to reading anything written about China from an external perspective. James Kynge definitely makes an admirable effort, but the tone of the books is, at times, skewed and has a tendency to veer from rational to a sense that the Chinese will swarm over the earth like locusts and destroy us all.

Naturally, I am a little uncomfortable with the latter being put out in to the world as an idea.

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China Shakes the World: A Titan's Rise and Troubled Future -- and the Challenge for America [James Kynge] on taodugahambui.gq *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. “Let China sleep, for when she wakes, she will shake the world.” Napoleon's. taodugahambui.gq: China Shakes the World: A Titan's Rise and Troubled Future - and the Challenge for America (Audible Audio Edition): James Kynge, Robert.

I would describe it more as economic scaremongering than out and out bad journalism, but never the less All in all, however, China Shakes the World is definitely a very eye-opening perspective; both on the current global economic climate, and China's dramatic rise since Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms began in We all take the "Made in China" label for granted, but I don't think any of us appreciate how much China's economy directly affects our daily lives; keeping prices down and producing either the part or the entire product for most things that we own.

China's economy itself seems ridiculous from the outside; the yuan is set at a fixed value, companies are shored up by the national banks and so can continue to function when making ridiculous losses, but Kynge navigates this minefield of apparent reverse business logic, making it understandable even to the laywoman. His inclusion of the environmental impact of industry on China was particularly illuminating, as he has travelled to many of these places himself and reveals what the Party and the media tend to strive to keep from international eyes. Obviously, this is a book for those interested either in China or economics.

Hilariously, it brought me from being a student of the former, to that of both. Perhaps it is Kynge's accessible writing style, or the fact that I had never really delved into the subject before, but economics really is just another form of history and I would not hesitate to recommend this book as another piece of the history of modern China.

Albeit to be taken with a small pinch of salt. The book, published in , tells the story of China's rise in the previous two decades, eventually becoming a world superpower.

China Shakes the World by James Kynge; China’s Trapped Transition by Minxin Pei

I read the book in , and although 8 years after its publication, it's still very relevant to understand the transformation China went through in the last decades of the XX century and first few years of the XXI century. Hindsight only makes this book even more current and fascinating.

The author is a British journalist that has lived in or around China for many ye The book, published in , tells the story of China's rise in the previous two decades, eventually becoming a world superpower. The author is a British journalist that has lived in or around China for many years, and his first-hand experience as a Westerner in China enables him to understand the contrast between the Chinese and the Western perceptions of the world and produce a book full of insight. The text provides telling examples of the transformation of the Chinese business and industry sectors since Deng Xiaping's reforms and also of its consequences, felt not only across the Chinese society but throughout the world.